1929 Stutz Model M Monte Carlo
SOLD

Location: Indianapolis
VIN #:
Engine:OHC Straight 8
Transmission:4 Speed Manual
Wheelbase:130"
Mileage:

Stutz was founded as the Ideal Motor Car Company in Indianapolis IN in 1911. Ideal entered a car in the Indianapolis 500that year and placed 11th, earning it the slogan, "the car that made good in a day". The next year, the founder, Harry C Stutz , renamed the company Stutz Motor Company and began selling high-performance roadsters like the famous Stutz Bearcat. The Bearcat featured a brawny 4-cylinder T-head engine with four valves per cylinder, one of the earliest multi valve engines.

Stutz was forced to raise money to fund his automobile production, eventually selling the company in 1919 after a falling out with the company's major stockholders, Allen Ryan, who then went bankrupt. In 1922, three Stutz investors, one of whom was Charles Schwab, gained control of the company. The new owners brought in Frederick Moskowics, formerly of Daimler Benz, Marmon, and Franklin, in 1923. Moskowics quickly refocused the company as a developer of safety cars, a recurring theme in the auto industry. In the case of Stutz, the car featured safety glass, a low center of gravity for better handling, and a hill-holding transmission called "Noback". One notable advance was the 1931 DOHC 32-valve in-line 8 (designed by Fred Duesenberg), called the "DV32" (DV for 'dual valve'). This was during the so-called "cylinders race" of the early 1930s, when makers of expensive cars were rushing to produce multi-cylinder engines. While Stutz did not have the resources to design and tool a new engine, the DV32 did allow them to brand their cars with a larger number than any of its competitors, who were advertising 12- and 16-cylinder engines in their own cars.

In 1927, a Stutz set a world record for speed, averaging 68 mph for 24 hours. The following year, a 4.9 litre Stutz in the hands of Robert Bloch and Edouard Brisson finished second at the 24 Hours of LeMans to the 4.5 litre Bentley of Rubin and Barnato, despite losing top gear 90 minutes from the flag, the best result for an American car until 1966. That same year, development engineer and racing driver Frank Lockhart used a pair of supercharged 91ci DOHC engines in his Stutz Black Hawk Special streamliner Land Speed Record car, while Stutz set another speed record at Daytona, reaching 106.53 mph in the hands of Gil Anderson. In 1929, three Stutzes, with bodies designed by Gordon Buehrig, built by Weymann's U.S. subsidiary, and powered by a 155 HP 322ci superchargred straight 8 ran at Le Mans, piloted by Edouard Brisson, George Eyston, and co-drivers Phillippe de Rothschild and Guy Bouriat; de Rothschild and Bouriat placed fifth after the other two cars fell out with split fuel tanks.

Production ended in 1935 after 35,000 cars had been manufactured. The former Indianapolis factory is today known as the Stutz Business Center and is home to more than eighty artists, sculptors, photographers, designers, architects, and craftsmen.

Despite the relatively high production figure mentioned above, less than 400 Stutz cars of all types are known to remain today.

Among the most famous of all custom body styles offered on Stutz Chassis in the late 20' s and early 30' s, the Weymann Monte Carlo embodies all the best of Sporting Design. Known for their lightweight bodies based on airplane construction, the Weymann Body Company was well known for Fabric Covered coachwork, with branches not only domestically but in Europe as well. Similiar construction was used on the most sporting European Chassis, most notably Bentley, whose famous "Blue Train" mirrored the Monte Carlo design. With its " Chopped Top" and integrated trunk, the Monte Carlo looks fast standing still.

Less than a handful of the Stutz Monte Carlos are known to survive.

This exceptionally nicely restored example still presents as a freshly restored car, in fact it just received a CCCA Senior Badge in judging this Summer. The paint is exceptional, the chrome without fault, the fabric body is tight and taunt-the doors shut securely and swing freely with no sag whatsoever. The interior is elegant and at the same time somewhat snazzy with its period Art Deco patterned Broadcloth upholstery. The Walnut veneered Dash serves as the perfect backdrop for the jewelry like guages.

The car runs and drives quite well. It starts right up, runs smoothly, accellerates briskly, stops with authority, and handles very well for the era. This is a very drivable car that could be confidently toured should one wish to do so.

Most certainly welcome at the most descriminating Concours Worldwide, this extremely rare and desirable car will be a Contender wherever shown. The car has been honored to be displayed in the first non race car exhibit at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum opening in earlyDecember. This is an important Stutz, which can easily be the centerpiece of any collection.

With recent comparable examples trading into the 7 figures, this is literally a once in a lifetime opportunity to acquire one of the most important Stutz in existence at a very fair price.

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